January 05, 2014

On this day January 5th...

DARC Ethiophile Chronicles

On this day

January 5 is George Washington Carver Day in honor of the brilliant agricultural chemist who transitioned on this day in 1943. Nicknamed "the Peanut Man" and the "Wizard of Tuskegee," Carver headed the agricultural department of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and was one of the most prominent scientist of his day. He was renowned for finding new uses for everyday items. Carver's research in improved farming techniques helped to revolutionize farming in America. He once wrote, "I wanted to know the name of every stone and flower and insect and bird and beast." At his transition, he left his life savings, more than $60,000, to found the George Washington Carver Institute for Agriculture at Tuskegee. In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated funds to erect a monument at Diamond, Missouri, in his honor.

Commemorative postage stamps were issued in 1948 and again in 1998. A George Washington Carver half-dollar coin was minted between 1951 and 1954. There are two U.S. military vessels named in his honor.

There are also numerous scholarships and schools named for him. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from Simpson College. Since his exact birth date is unknown, Congress has designated January 5 as George Washington Carver Recognition Day.

Carver quotes:

"Ninety-nine percent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses."

"Fear of something is at the root of hate for others, and hate within will eventually destroy the hater."

"Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom."

"When you do the common things in life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world."

"Where there is no vision, there is no hope."

"Nothing is more beautiful than the loveliness of the woods before sunrise."

"There is no short cut to achievement. Life requires thorough preparation - veneer isn't worth anything."

"Learn to do common things uncommonly well; we must always keep in mind that anything that helps fill the dinner pail is valuable."

β€œIt is not the style of clothes one wears, neither the kind of automobile one drives, nor the amount of money one has in the bank that counts. These mean nothing. It is simply service that measures success.”

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